Breastmilk and Daycare: Not just how much, but how

Breastmilk and Daycare: Not just how much, but how?

Heading back to work while breastfeeding is no doubt a challenge. In this week’s kids’ nutrition Ask Amanda column, pediatric dietitian Amanda Gordon offers some ideas to ease into bottle feeding at day care while still breastfeeding.

Q: Hi Amanda, my breastfed daughter is 5 months old. She started daycare one month ago, and I pump and send breastmilk bottles to daycare. Now daycare is saying that she wants more and that I am not sending enough breastmilk. They also say she spits up there. She doesn’t seem to do this at home and rarely seems hungry right after breastfeeding. 

A: It might be good idea to talk to daycare about how they are feeding her, in addition to the amount.  Day care centers are busy places and often have babies on schedules for eating – I remember this well from when my children were in daycare! Schedules can be a good thing, but make sure that the daycare center is paying attention to your daughter’s cues and when she is hungry.  I would also make sure that the daycare center is using paced-bottle feeding, which mimics breastfeeding and how your daughter is used to eating.  A video can be helpful to watch.  A slower flow bottle nipple will also increase the time that the feeds take, which may help her feel full as well. 

If she is fussy right after eating, it might not be hunger. Make sure they are getting good burps out of her, then wait 20 minutes to see if she really wants more.  You could always send one or two more bottles just with 1-2 ounces, so that they don’t waste any breastmilk!

Ask Amanda is a weekly column from Feed to Succeed dietitian Amanda Gordon. Have a question? Email Amanda and let her know or submit an “Ask Amanda” question for a future column.

Body Weight and the Young Athlete

Body Weight and Young Athletes

Coach encouraging you to lose or gain some weight for performance? This episode features youth sports dietitian, Melanie Battaglia, discussing nutrition and body weight amongst young athletes. Betsy and Jen ask some pointed questions about when it is or is not appropriate for an athlete to gain or lose weight for their sport, and whose discretion is appropriate to make that determination.  

Click here to listen on iTunes

Athletic Kids, Food Fads and Sports Supplements

Athletic Kids, Food Fads and Sports Supplements

Feed to Succeed sports dietitian, Melanie Battaglia, joins the pediatric nutrition program with Betsy and Jen to discuss the use of performance enhancing supplements and food fads for young athletes. Do your teenage or elementary age children face frequent diet challenges, opinions and even pressure from coaches, peers and other well-intended people? This podcast is for you. 

Click here to listen on iTunes

vegan protein for kids

Let’s Talk EdaMOMe!

In this week’s kids’ nutrition Ask Amanda column, pediatric dietitian Amanda Gordon answers the question: Hi Amanda, what are the best protein alternatives for kids that are not meat and dairy?

This is a great question. Protein is important for all children. It plays an essential role in the body by ensuring that muscles, organs, hair and nails grow and work properly.  Protein, along with carbohydrates and fat are the macronutrients that children need to get from their food for growth and development.  Carbohydrates are the preferred energy source for kids. Protein and fat are also important because they help children stay and feel full. 

Nut butters can be a great source of protein for kids. Peanut butter is often a crowd-pleaser, however almond butter is another good protein source. Nut butters also contain fat and help with satiety. Almond butter can have a thinner consistency than peanut butter and some children prefer this.  Almond butter spreads on whole grain waffles well for meals or snacks, it also blends into oatmeal well for a meal or snack.  

Edamame is another good protein source for healthy kids. Shelled edamame (either steamed or roasted) can be a great snack or side dish at meal times. Edamame can also be blended into a spread and made into a dip or hummus.  

Vegetable and non-animal protein foods are great additions to healthy diet, but many are not complete protein sources, meaning they don’t have all of the needed amino acids. Vegetarian and vegan diets are suitable for growing children, however careful attention should be paid to ensure that children get all the amino acids they need. Our Feed to Succeed dietitians are always available to help families figure this pediatric nutrition and diet out! 

Ask Amanda is a weekly column from Feed to Succeed dietitian Amanda Gordon. Have a question? Email Amanda and let her know or submit an “Ask Amanda” question for a future column.