Entries by feedtosucceed

Mother’s Day Breakfast in Bed

Now’s the time to start hinting to the family that soon is…ahem..Mother’s Day. All a mother needs is a little pampering, right? And besides, kids who spend time cooking in the kitchen grow up to be healthier eaters. In fact, this post is entirely for them, not moms at all. 😉

GLUTEN FREE PANCAKES

2 large fresh whole eggs
2 tbsp vegetable oil
2 cup nonfat cows skim milk
1 tsp vanilla extract
2 1/3 cup brown rice flour
2 tbsp granulated sugar
1 1/2 tsp kosher, non-aluminum, low-electrolyte baking powder
3/4 tsp salt
3/4 tsp kosher gluten replacement xanthan gum

Pancakes GF2

Directions:

1. Preheat griddle or skillet over medium heat adding a little oil if desired.
2. Whisk together eggs, oil, milk and vanilla.
3. In a separate bowl, whisk together dry ingredients.
4. Fold dry ingredients into the egg mixture until moist. Do not over-mix; batter will be a little lumpy.
5. Pour 1/4 cupfuls onto the preheated griddle and spread out in circular motion to desired thickness.
6. Cook pancakes for 2-4 minutes (there should be lots of little holes in the batter) then flip and cook another minute or until golden.
Note: Gluten-free pancakes may stick to the pan more than non-gluten-free pancakes so be sure to loosen pancakes from griddle or skillet before flipping.

This recipe and more is in our gluten free cookbook.

Gluten free’s not for you? Try these amazing banana pancakes from an earlier blog post:

PANCAKES

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Homemade Soft Pretzels

It’s #NationalPretzelDay because every food apparently needs its chance to shine. You can make these at home in less than 10 minutes, and they’ll rival the ones that waft through the mall any day.

And you know what? They’re healthy enough to eat with dinner.

Whole wheat soft pretzels

HOMEMADE PRETZELS (from Peas and Thank You cookbook)
3/4 warm water
2t sugar
1t yeast
2.5 cups whole wheat pastry flour
1t salt
2T butter or Earth Balance
10 cups water
2/3 cup baking soda
2T kosher salt

Dissolve yeast and sugar in warm water and let stand for 10 minutes. Combine flour, salt and butter with a blender and dough hook. Add yeast mixture and knead with blender and then with hands until fully combined. Place in well-oiled bowl, cover with warm towel and place in a warm place (I use the oven with the only the light on). Let sit for 1 hour.

Boil the water and baking soda. Roll out the dough into twists and then a pretzel shape. Or a flower. Or your initials. Dunk each pretzel in the water for 30 seconds. Place on wax paper and sprinkle salt on. Bake in oven at 450 degrees for 12 minutes.

Vitamins, A-Z

Vitamin A

What is vitamin A?
Vitamin A is a fat soluble (requires fat to be absorbed) vitamin that is needed for vision, gene expression, and growth of cells. Carotenoids (anti-oxidant) are also a form of vitamin A and are needed for eye health and heart disease.

What foods contain Vitamin A?
Vitamin A can be found in liver, dairy, eggs, and fortified cereals.

Does my child need a vitamin A supplement?
Consuming a well balanced diet, composed of different fruits, vegetables, grains, dairy, and meat, should provide adequate vitamin A. Children with fat malabsorption conditions, such as Cystic Fibrosis, often need a vitamin supplement containing vitamin A.

What are signs of too little Vitamin A?
Poor vitamin A intake can cause night blindness, increase susceptibility to infections, retarded growth, and white accumulation of cells in the eye.

What can too much Vitamin A cause?
An overdose or toxicity of Vitamin A can present with nausea, vomiting and double vision. With chronic toxicity, there can be hair loss, muscle pain, and liver damage. If taken in excess in pregnancy, it can cause birth defects.

 

Vitamin B1 (Thiamin)

What is vitamin B1?

Vitamin B1, or Thiamin, is a water soluble (does not require fat to be absorbed) vitamin that is needed for the formation of blood components and the release of energy from our cells.

Where foods contain Vitamin B1?

Vitamin B1 can be found in whole grains, fortified grains (a food that vitamin/minerals have been added to), enriched grains (a food that vitamins/minerals have been added to replace those lost during the refining processing), legumes and meat.

Does my child need a vitamin B1 supplement?

Consuming a well-balanced diet, composed of various grains, should provide adequate vitamin B1. Children on unrestricted diets rarely require a vitamin B1 supplement. Children following restricted diets, such as a gluten free diet, may need supplemental B1. In addition, children with malabsorption conditions, such as Crohn’s Disease, may need a vitamin supplement.

What are signs of too little Vitamin B1?

A deficiency can present with weakness, loss of appetite, rapid heart rate, confusion, and memory loss.

What can too much Vitamin B1 cause?

An overdose or toxicity of Vitamin B1 has not been established. Meaning they haven’t seen toxicity of vitamin B1 when consumed through food or supplements. Water soluble vitamins are excreted through urine when they are not needed. They do not get stored in our tissue, therefore toxicity is extremely difficult to reach (in most water soluble vitamins).

 

Vitamin B2 (Riboflavin)

What is vitamin B2?

Vitamin B2, or Riboflavin, is a water soluble (does not require fat to be absorbed) vitamin that is needed for

Where can Vitamin B2 be found?

Vitamin B2 can be found in fortified grains (a food that vitamin/minerals have been added to), milk, eggs, and meat.

Does my child need a vitamin B2 supplement?

Consuming a well balanced diet, composed of various grains, meats, eggs, and dairy, should provide adequate vitamin B2. Children on unrestricted diets rarely require a vitamin B1 supplement. Children with malabsorption conditions, such as Crohn’s Disease, may need a vitamin B2 supplement.

What are signs of too little Vitamin B2?A deficiency can present with lesions around the corner of the mouth, inflammation of the tongue and mouth, and nerve dysfunction.

What can too much Vitamin B2 cause?

An overdose or toxicity of Vitamin B2 has not been established. Meaning they haven’t seen toxicity of vitamin B2 when consumed through food or supplements. Water soluble vitamins are excreted through urine when they are not needed. They do not get stored in our tissue, therefore toxicity is extremely difficult to reach (in most water soluble vitamins).

 

Vitamin B3 (Niacin)

What is vitamin B3?

Vitamin B3 is a water soluble (does not require fat to be absorbed) vitamin that is needed for energy production within our cells.

Where can Vitamin B3 be found?

Vitamin B3 can be found in fortified grains (a food that vitamin/minerals have been added to), enriched grains (a food that vitamins/minerals have been added to replace those lost during the refining processing), legumes, nuts, and meat.

Does my child need a vitamin B3 supplement?

Consuming a well balanced diet should provide adequate vitamin B3. Children on unrestricted diets rarely require a vitamin B3 supplement. Children with malabsorption conditions, such as Crohn’s Disease, may need a vitamin B3 supplement.

What does a deficiency of Vitamin B3 look like?

A deficiency can present with dermatitis (skin looking sunburned), memory loss, inflammation of the tongue, and vomiting.

What can to much Vitamin cause?

An overdose or toxicity of Vitamin B3 can present with itching, skin flushing, heartburn, nausea, and vomiting.

 

Vitamin B5 (Pantothenic Acid)

What is vitamin B5?

Vitamin B5, or Pantothenic Acid), is a water soluble (does not require fat to be absorbed) vitamin that is needed for normal cell function.

Where can Vitamin B5 be found?

Vitamin B5 can be found in almost in all food sources. It is present in most plan and animal products. In fact, grains are not even fortified/enriched with vitamin B5 since it is present in so many sources naturally.

Does my child need a vitamin B5 supplement?

Consuming a well balanced diet will provide adequate vitamin B5. Children rarely require supplementation of vitamin B5. Children with malabsorption conditions, such as Crohn’s Disease, may need a vitamin supplement.

What are signs of too little Vitamin B5?

A deficiency can present with toe numbness and a burning sensation of the feet.

What does too much Vitamin B5 cause?

An overdose or toxicity of Vitamin B5 can present with stomach pain, and diarrhea. has not been established. Water soluble vitamins are excreted through urine when they are not needed. They do not get stored in our tissue, therefore toxicity is extremely difficult to reach (in most water soluble vitamins).

 

Vitamin B6 (Pyridoxine)

What is vitamin B6?

Vitamin B6, or Pyridoxine, is a water soluble (does not require fat to be absorbed) vitamin that is needed for amino acid (protein) metabolism.

Where can Vitamin B6 be found?

Vitamin B6 can be found in fortified grains (a food that vitamin/minerals have been added to), vegetables, and animal products (meat, dairy, eggs).

Does my child need a vitamin B6 supplement?

Consuming a well balanced diet, composed of various vegetables and animal products, should provide adequate vitamin B6. Children on unrestricted diets rarely require a vitamin B6 supplement. Children with malabsorptive conditions, such a Crohn’s disease, may require an additional vitamin B6 supplement.

What are effects of too little Vitamin B6?

A deficiency (extremely rare) can present with inflammation of the tongue, lesions at the sides of the mouth, seizures, and convulsions.

What can too much Vitamin B6 cause?

An overdose or toxicity of Vitamin B6 can present with numbness in the arms and legs. Water soluble vitamins are excreted through urine when they are not needed. They do not get stored in our tissue, therefore toxicity is extremely difficult to reach (in most water soluble vitamins).

 

Vitamin B7 (Biotin)

What is vitamin B7?

Vitamin B7, or Biotin, is a water soluble (does not require fat to be absorbed) vitamin that is needed for the growth of our cells.

Where can Vitamin B7 be found?

Vitamin B7 can be found in eggs, nuts, legumes, grains, and liver.

Does my child need a vitamin B7 supplement?

Consuming a well balanced diet, composed of eggs and grains, should provide adequate vitamin B6. Children on unrestricted diets rarely require a vitamin B6 supplement. Children with malabsorptive conditions, such a Crohn’s disease, may require an additional vitamin B7 supplement.

What are signs of too little Vitamin B7?

A deficiency can present with hair loss, scaly skin, fatigue, brittle nails, and rashes around the mouth/eyes.

What can too much Vitamin B7 cause?

An overdose or toxicity of Vitamin B7 has not been established. Meaning they haven’t seen toxicity of vitamin B7 when consumed through food or supplements. Water soluble vitamins are excreted through urine when they are not needed. They do not get stored in our tissue, therefore toxicity is extremely difficult to reach (in most water soluble vitamins).

 

Vitamin D

What is vitamin D?
Vitamin D is a fat soluble (requires fat to be absorbed) vitamin that is needed for calcium homeostasis, osteoporosis prevention, blood pressure regulation, and immune system function.

Where foods contain Vitamin D?
Vitamin D can be found in animal products and dairy products. Some examples of sources are fish oil, tuna, eggs (specifically the yolk), milk, and yogurt. Vitamin D can also be obtained by the sun! Vegetarian sources of vitamin D can be found in fortified products (fortified orange juice, fortified soy milk, and cheerios).

Does my child need a vitamin D supplement
We recommend that children consume a daily vitamin D supplement with a minimum of 400IU/day, but will likely increase to 800-100IU/day in the next few years. Currently research has indicated that it is very difficult to consume adequate vitamin D through our diets, which is why a daily supplement is recommended. When picking a supplement, choose Vitamin D3 (not vitamin D2) as it is the active form of vitamin D and will be absorbed more efficiently.

What are signs of too little Vitamin D?
Poor vitamin D intake can cause growth retardation in children, seizures, bowing of the legs (rickets), enlarged wrists and ankles, and spine curving.

What does a toxicity of Vitamin D look like?
An overdose or toxicity of Vitamin D can present with anorexia, nausea, vomiting, renal failure, and calcification of soft tissues. It is not possible to have toxic levels of vitamin D from sun exposure.

 

Vitamin B9 (Folate)

What is vitamin B9?

Vitamin B9, or Folate, is a water soluble (does not require fat to be absorbed) vitamin that is needed for amino acid (protein) metabolism and DNA synthesis.

Where can Vitamin B9 be found?

Vitamin B9 can be found in dark leafy green vegetables, legumes, fruit, and enriched grains (a food that vitamins/minerals have been added to replace those lost during the refining processing).

Does my child need a vitamin B9 supplement?

Consuming a well balanced diet should provide adequate vitamin B6. Children on unrestricted diets rarely require a vitamin B9 supplement. Children with malabsorptive conditions, such a Crohn’s disease, may require an additional vitamin B9 supplement.

What does a deficiency of Vitamin B9 look like?

Vitamin B9 deficiency is extremely rare. Many foods are fortified with B9 to prevent neural tube defects in infants during pregnancy. A deficiency can present with a specific type of anemia (megaloblastic anemia) which presents with fatigue, headaches, and difficulty concentrating.

What does a toxicity of Vitamin B6 look like?

An overdose or toxicity of Vitamin B9 has not been established. Meaning they haven’t seen toxicity of vitamin B9 when consumed through food or supplements. Water soluble vitamins are excreted through urine when they are not needed. They do not get stored in our tissue, therefore toxicity is extremely difficult to reach (in most water soluble vitamins).

Vitamin B12 (Cobalamin)

What is vitamin B12?

Vitamin B12 is a water soluble (does not require fat to be absorbed) vitamin that is needed for enzyme conversion needed for healthy heart function.

Where can Vitamin B12 be found?

Vitamin B12 can be found in animal sources (clams, liver, oysters, milk, eggs). It can also be found in fortified grains (a food that vitamin/minerals have been added to).

Does my child need a vitamin B12 supplement?

Consuming a well balanced diet, composed of various animal items and fortified grains, should provide adequate vitamin B12. Children on unrestricted diets rarely require a vitamin B12 supplement. Sometimes children following a vegetarian diet can benefit from a vitamin B12 supplement. In addition, children with malabsorptive conditions, such a Crohn’s disease, may require an additional vitamin B6 supplement.

What does a deficiency of Vitamin B12 look like?

A deficiency can present with memory loss and a specific type of anemia (megaloblastic anemia), which presents with fatigue, headaches, and difficulty concentrating. This is the same anemia that can be found in B9 deficiency.

What does a toxicity of Vitamin B12 look like?

An overdose or toxicity of Vitamin B12 has not been established. Meaning they haven’t seen toxicity of vitamin B12 when consumed through food or supplements. Water soluble vitamins are excreted through urine when they are not needed. They do not get stored in our tissue, therefore toxicity is extremely difficult to reach (in most water soluble vitamins).

Vitamin C

What is vitamin C?

Vitamin C is a water soluble (does notvrequire fat to be absorbed) vitamin that is needed for the synthesis of various important enzymes and for antioxidant function.

Where can Vitamin C be found?

Vitamin C can be found in fruits (oranges, grapefruit, cantaloupe, strawberries) and vegetables (green peppers, broccoli, cauliflower, sweet potato).

Does my child need a vitamin C supplement?

Consuming a well balanced diet, composed of various fruits and vegetables, should provide adequate vitamin C. Children on unrestricted diets rarely require a vitamin C supplement. Children with malabsorptive conditions, such a Crohn’s disease, may require an additional vitamin C supplement.

What does a deficiency of Vitamin C look like?

A deficiency can present with bleeding gums, skin discoloration, and decaying teeth (all signs of scurvy).

What does a toxicity of Vitamin C look like?

An overdose or toxicity of Vitamin C can present with stomch pain and kidney stones. Water soluble vitamins are excreted through urine when they are not needed. They do not get stored in our tissue, therefore toxicity is extremely difficult to reach (in most water soluble vitamins).

 

Vitamin E

What is vitamin E?
Vitamin E is a fat soluble (requires fat to be absorbed) vitamin that is needed for antioxidant activity, heart disease prevention, eye health, and cancer prevention.

Where foods contain Vitamin E?
Vitamin E can be found in grains, fortified grains, plant oils, nuts, and seeds. It can also be found in high fat meat sources.

Does my child need a vitamin E supplement?
Consuming a well balanced diet, composed of grains, nuts, seeds, plant oils, and meat should provide adequate vitamin A. Children with fat malabsorption conditions, such as Cystic Fibrosis, often need a vitamin supplement containing vitamin E.

What are signs of too little Vitamin E?
Poor vitamin E intake can cause hemolytic anemia, loss of coordination in the limbs, skeletal muscle pain, and weakness. Please note, a deficiency in Vitamin E is rare and impacts those with fat malabsorption issues.

What does a toxicity of Vitamin E look like?
An overdose or toxicity of Vitamin E can present with an increase in bleeding, nausea, diarrhea, increased severity of respiratory infections, muscle weakness, and fatigue.

 

Vitamin K

What is vitamin K?
Vitamin K is a fat soluble (requires fat to be absorbed) vitamin that is needed for blood clotting, bone formation, and osteoporosis prevention.

Where can Vitamin K be found?
Vitamin K can be found in plant products (kale, turnip greens, cauliflower, broccoli), soy bean oil, and liver.

Does my child need a vitamin K supplement?
Consuming a well balanced diet, composed of various vegetables, should provide adequate vitamin K. Children with fat malabsorption conditions, such as Cystic Fibrosis, often need a vitamin supplement containing vitamin K. In addition, individuals on chronic antibiotics may benefit from vitamin K supplementation.

What are signs of too little Vitamin K?
Poor vitamin K intake can cause uncontrolled bleeding episodes. Deficiency is rare in healthy individuals.

 What does a toxicity of Vitamin K look like?
An overdose or toxicity of Vitamin K can present with liver damage, elevated bilirubin levels, and jaundice.

 

 

 

Mint Chocolate Chip Surprise for St. Paddy’s Day

St. Patrick’s Day, like nearly every holiday, brings with it lots of sugary, food colored snacks. Sneaky parents, though, can still manage to please their kids with healthy eats. Try either of these for breakfast, lunch or after school. Cheers!

mint smoothie 2

Mint chocolate chip smoothie. They’ll never know it has spinach unless you tell them!

 

Mint Chocolate Chip Surprise

  • 1/2 cup plain or vanilla yogurt
  • 1 overripe banana
  • 1/2 cup milk
  • 1/4 cup fresh spinach
  • 1/2t vanilla
  • 1T real maple syrup (omit if you used vanilla yogurt)
  • 2 drops mint extract
  • 1T chocolate chips

Blend the yogurt, milk, banana and spinach until smooth. Add the remaining ingredients and blend until chips are mostly chopped. Serve very cold.

 

Green Tropical Smoothie

  • 6 oz orange juice or skim milk
  • ¼ cup pineapple chunks
  • ¼ cup mango
  • ¼ cup spinach
  • ¼ avocado
  • ½ cup ice

Blend and enjoy.

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4 Weeks to a Healthier Home

March is National Nutrition Month–what better time to make a commitment to healScreen shot 2013-04-03 at 11.33.57 AMthy living? Following are four tips for creating a healthier home that we think are attainable for any family. The idea is to adopt one tip per week, or adapt the ideas to what works in your own home. If you have any of your own suggestions, do share!

1. Buy food plain and flavor it yourself. Take a look at the ingredients on flavored oatmeal, flavored yogurt or packaged couscous. They’re full of ingredients you can’t pronounce and pretty much don’t need. They’re meant to preserve the products’ shelf life and taste salty or sweet enough to keep you shoveling in the spoonfuls. Plain yogurt, plain oatmeal, raw and plain grains–not only is it healthier to flavor food yourself, but it’s also cheaper. For yogurt and oatmeal, we add honey or real maple syrup.

2. Avoid trans fat. If you haven’t done this yet, toss out the trans fat. This isn’t so hard these days because avoiding trans fat is now so trendy that even Oreo’s no longer Screen Shot 2014-03-27 at 4.23.43 PMcontain it. Look for partially hydrogenated oils, margarine or shortening in ingredient lists and then look for an alternative, similar product. In your own baking, instead of margarine, use butter, coconut oil or at the very least, Earth Balance.

3. Add whole grains to your diet. Not every family is able to switch over entirely to whole grains without an all out riot from the kids. Try instead to add whole grains little by little. Add a cup of whole wheat to baked goods when a recipe calls for two cups of flour. Mix in some brown rice with your normal white rice recipe and call it pilaf.

4. Eat leafy greens. Leafy greens are the power food of every diet, yet most people hardly eat any. Leafy vegetables are brimming with fiber along with vitamins, minerals, and plant-based substances that can protect you from heart disease, diabetes and perhaps even cancer. Plus, if you know how to cook them, they’re delicious (we promise!). It’s easy to toss in spinach or kale to a recipe, while serving the same meal to picky eaters plain. Eat it enough, and you just might encourage the rest of your family to give it a try.

The Importance of Fiber By Gia Diakakis, RD

Among children and adults alike, fiber is one of the most often macronutrients in the diet. When considering macronutrients, most people focus on carbohydrates, protein, and fat. Fiber, though, plays a vital role in gut health, stool patterns, weight management and satiety.

What is fiber?

“Dietary fiber is the edible parts of plants or analogous carbohydrates that are resistant to digestion and absorption in the human small intestine with complete or partial fermentation in the large intestine. Dietary fiber includes polysaccharides, oligosaccharides, lignin and associated plant substances. Dietary fibers promote beneficial physiological effects including laxation, and/or blood cholesterol attenuation, and/or blood glucose attenuation.” 1

Simply put, fiber can be found in fruits, vegetables, and whole grains. Fiber helps us feel full longer, helps keep our bowels moving and clean, and helps with weight loss or weight maintenance. Think of it as the broom or squeegee that brushes up against our stomach and intestines as it moves through our gastrointestinal tracts. When it rubs against our lining, it takes “gunk” along with it and our bodies eliminate it. This is how our intestines stay healthy and clean.

How fiber helps our bodies

Fiber is also clunky and large. It takes up a lot of space in our stomachs, which makes us feel full. It also exits our stomach much slower than its macronutrient counterpart, carbohydrate. Those two characteristics (large and slow exit) are what help us feel full much longer than if we ate a meal composed of simple carbohydrates (such as white bread or white rice).

How to eat more fiber

Grains can be an excellent source of fiber depending on their form. Grains, in their natural form, are whole grain. They are composed of the bran, endosperm and the germ. Examples of easy to find whole grains are quinoa, steel cut oatmeal, brown rice and whole rye. Consuming these will help us reach our difficult-to-achieve daily fiber goal.

However, when these whole grains are processed, it is difficult to tell how much of their fiber and other nutrients have stayed intact. Reading labels is always tricky and can be misleading. Something labeled “made from whole grain” can mean 5% of it contains whole grain, or 95% of it. This can make grocery shopping very frustrating.

Keep these tips in mind

  • Try to find items where “whole grain” is the first ingredient and made with as few ingredients as possible.
  • If a whole grain is the first ingredient, but the next whole grain ingredient is 10 ingredients down the list, the item may not be a good choice.
  • Eat your fruits, vegetables, and whole grain, and eat lots of them!

 

Super Bowl Pizza Bites

Whether Sunday finds you as the football party type or the bake-with-your-kids-on-vacation type, this recipe is for you. The dough is easy to make in a food processor, and you can use your slave labor little people to make the stuffed balls of dough. You just might want to double the recipe, though. These go fast.

PIZZA BITES
whole wheat pizza dough (see recipe below)
Mozzarella cheese
pizza sauce (I use Trader Joes, but you could use any homemade or store bought recipe)
roasted chopped veggies of choice

Prepare your pizza dough and let it rise. Roast chopped veggies of choice at 375 degrees for at least 30 minutes or until lightly browned. I used onions, garlic and mushrooms. Warm your sauce in a pot and add the roasted veggies to it (I also added fresh spinach).

Dip for the dough balls that's delicious on its own

Lower the oven to 350 degrees. Divide dough into many small balls and flatten like a pancake. Add mozzarella cheese to the middle and roll into ball around it. It’s okay, even ideal, if some of the cheese sticks out. Place the balls in a pile in an 8×8 baking dish. Bake for 20 minutes.

Serve the pizza bites and the sauce in separate bowls and let everyone dip.

EASY WHOLE WHEAT PIZZA DOUGH
3 cups whole wheat flour
1/4 cup gluten (optional, but this makes it softer and more doughy)
2t sea salt
2t yeast
3T olive oil
1 cup warm water

Mix the flour, gluten, salt and yeast in a food processor. While it’s running, slowly add the olive oil and the warm water. If the dough is not wet enough, add a little more, a teaspoon at a time. If it’s too wet, remove it and knead in a little more flour. Place the dough in a well-oiled bowl and cover it with a wet towel. Keep it in a warm place (like your oven with just the light on) for at least an hour.

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National Peanut Butter Day Cookies

It wasn’t until I got rid of cookbooks that I started to enjoy cooking. Sure, I still use them a bit, but looking back and forth at a recipe is tiresome. Throwing ingredients in a bowl and coming up with something halfway decent is fun. A little like being a scientist or artist, right?

So, here’s a little secret. Memorize the basic formula of cookies, and you can make them yourself. Somebody has to make up original recipes, so why not you?

Peanut butter (or any nut butter) is optional. But today, it’s mandatory. Creamy or chunky, take your pick, but on Jan. 24, it’s a must.

BASIC COOKIES
2 cups any kind of flour or combination of flours (almond, wheat, spelt, oat to name a few. I recommend at least 1/2 cup wheat for the right consistency)
1t baking powder
1/2t baking soda
1/2t cinnamon (optional)
1/2t salt
1/2 cup butter, Earth Balance or coconut oil (coconut oil gives a flavor and doesn’t keep cookies together as well, but it works and is a healthy option)
1 egg
1/2 cup sugar
1/2 cup brown sugar
1/2 cup raisins, almonds, chocolate chips or whatever you like
1/4 cup almond butter or peanut butter

Peanut butter almond oat chocolate chip cookies

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Mix together your dry ingredients and add in the wet ingredients. Mix thoroughly. If your dough is too dry, add your choice of milk in tablespoons until you have the right cookie consistency. Roll into balls and flatten on baking pans. Cook for about 12 minutes.

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Why Kids Need a Variety of Fat By Gia Diakakis, RD

One of the reasons I have always been so passionate about nutrition is that it is tied to everything in life. Even things that may seem to have nothing to do with food and nutrition, like rising rates ADHD, is in one way or another linked to diet and eating habits.

Recently, I discussed a book, “Bringing Up Bébé,” with a friend. The book addresses the differences between French parenting and American parenting and cites lower incidences of ADHD there. We also discussed a recent article that shows a link between inadequate fat intake and ADHD in young boys.

The article contains about 40 pages of overflowing medical terminology and statistics that I loved reading. Chief among the facts is that our brains are mainly made up of fat, which makes fat in our diet crucial to healthy brain development. In this study, they delved into the ratio and levels of Omega-6, which can be found in raw nuts, seeds, legumes and unsaturated vegetable oils such as sesame, and Omega-3, which can be found in deep-water fish/flaxseeds/walnuts/etc. They found that modern diets have revealed that “omega-6 to omega-3 ratios in dietary intake have risen from about 1:1 to 2:1 to 20:1”. This is important because another similar study reported that when “comparing 35 young adults males with ADHD with healthy controls, and found that the ADHD group had a higher total omega-6/omega-3 ratio”.

So what does this all mean? Try to incorporate healthy sources of fats into your own and your children’s diet while making sure to eat a variety of food rather than just sticking to a couple sources of fat. Some healthy sources of fat are dairy products, flax seeds, chia seeds, olive oil, avocado, salmon, halibut, swordfish, walnuts, almonds, pistachios and many other foods! Incorporating fat into your diet will not make you fat if the portion size is correct. It is an important part of everyone’s diet and shouldn’t be feared! Stayed tuned for additional research to come out on this topic!

Food Myth Busters

With so much information out there on food, both research-based and pseudo science, it’s hard to know what to true and what is healthy. We are using this space to inform readers on the truth about many of the questions we receive. Want to ask your own question? Email info@feedtosucceed.com

Giving my child vitamin C supplements will prevent them from getting colds.

FALSE

Recent studies have shown that vitamin C supplementation is typically not effective for preventing colds. However, regular vitamin C supplementation prior to catching a cold may decrease the DURATION and SEVERITY of a cold. Studies show that the duration of a cold was 1-4 days less for those that regularly took a vitamin C supplement before catching a cold than for those that did not take a supplement.

Vitamin D deficiency is prevalent among children and adolescents.

TRUE

Vitamin D is important for bone growth and immune function.

Recommended dosage for supplementation:

-Children younger than 1 year old: 400 IU/day

-Kids older than 1 year old: 600 IU/day

Sunlight exposure is the best source, but it can also be found in fortified items such as milk, cereals, some brands of juice and yogurt, fatty fish such as salmon, tuna and mackerel, and eggs from hens that have been fed vitamin D.

An 8 oz. serving of milk contains 100IU.

Sun exposure for 30 minutes twice a week without sunscreen. Sunscreen blocks the synthesis of vitamin D.

Snacking can help children and teens achieve a healthy weight.

TRUE

Ideally, snacks and meals should be timed so that they are eaten every 3-4 hours. Healthy snack choices include fruit, vegetables, cheese, nuts/nut butters, and hummus. Unplanned, continuous snacking can result in unhealthy weight gain. Don’t allow snacking during screen time which can lead to overeating. It’s okay to stop snacks one hour before meals so that kids are hungry at mealtimes.

100% juice has the same nutritional value as a piece of fruit.

FALSE

In addition to all of the vitamins and minerals found in 100% juice, a piece of fruit contains fiber, which fills you up faster and keeps you satisfied for a longer period of time. Fiber also helps relieve constipation. You will also find additional phytonutrients in the edible peels and seeds of a piece of fruit. It is recommended that children’s diets focus on whole fruits first.

What is true regarding hydration in children and adolescent athletes?

  1. Water, not sports drinks, should be the main source of hydration.
  2. Routinely drinking sports drinks should be avoided or restricted because they can increase the risk of overweight and obesity.
  3. Sports drinks contain carbohydrates, minerals, electrolytes and flavoring, and are intended to replace water and electrolytes lost through sweating during exercise.
  4. Sports drinks, in combination with water, should be ingested during prolonged, vigorous physical activity that lasts for more than 60 minutes.
  5. All of the above.

Correct Answer 5: All of the above

All of the above answers are recommendations from the American Academy of Pediatrics.

What is true regarding breakfast for children and teens?

  1. Children and teens who eat breakfast function better in school and have better eating habits overall.
  2. Breakfast breaks the overnight fast and replenishes glucose levels, and children’s brains use more glucose than adult brains.
  3. Regularly eating breakfast is associated with overweight and obesity.
  4. A & B
  5. A, B & C

Answer: 4

A 2008 study in the journal Pediatrics found that adolescents who ate breakfast daily had a lower body mass index than teens who never ate breakfast or only on occasion.

Research suggests a breakfast that includes a source of protein and whole grains and is low in sugar and artificial additives improves concentration, comprehension, and memory recall in school-age children.